Archives

Biml Syntax Basics and Rules

Biml is a human readable XML language, created by a company called Varigence, which compiles into SQL Server objects such as tables, views, SSIS packages, and SSAS cubes. In this post, we’ll cover the basics of the Biml language so you can start coding as fast as possible. Since, I’ve always found that it’s easier [...]

HELLO to the WORLD of Biml

A “Hello World” program is an ages old traditional way to teach the basics of syntax for a programming language to a beginner. Since so many of us are just starting to use Biml Script, I thought it would be fun to start out with it. Also, I’ve made the entire solution available for download.

Before [...]

SQL Saturday Oklahoma City Wrap Up

This past weekend I made the trek to Oklahoma City to participate in their latest SQL Saturday. It was the first time I had spoken there, but it didn’t feel that way. Kristin Ferrier (Blog/Twitter), Jeremy Marx (Blog/Twitter), Matt Brimer (Twitter), Allen Smith (Blog/Twitter), and the rest of the team were so welcoming, just what [...]

Extracting Historical Dimension Records using T-SQL

Just because you can extract every single historical record for a dimension doesn’t mean you should. In this article, we’ll cover three basic extraction “methods” and when each of them may be preferred.

As with many of my Urge to Merge Series articles, this one will be presented in layers. In this case, each layer is [...]

Upcoming Presentations - NTSSUG and SQL Saturday OKC

Tonight at the North Texas SQL Server User Group

This is just a quick reminder that I’m presenting another hour in my continuing series Data Warehousing for the North Texas SQL Server User Group. We’ve already covered Dimension Tables in depth, so tonight I’ll be presenting, “Fact Tables – Show Me The Money!” I’ll explain the [...]

How to Properly Load Slowly Changing Dimensions using T-SQL Merge

One of the most compelling reasons to learn T-SQL Merge is that it performs Slowly Changing Dimension handling so well. This post is the fourth in a series called Have You Got the Urge to Merge?. This post builds on information from the other three, so I suggest you stop and read those before continuing, [...]

Using the Output Clause with T-SQL Merge

The Output clause, first implemented in SQL Server 2005, can be used to return information for each row modified by an Insert, Update, Delete or Merge statement. This functionality greatly increases the power and usefulness of Merge, and is required in the processing of Slowly Changing Dimensions.

This post is the second in a [...]

Writing T-SQL Merge Statements the Right Way

In a previous article, I discussed Merge statement basics. However, in extensive testing I’ve come to realize that my article, like most articles I’ve read about Merge leaves out or mis-handles several important aspects. Rather than edit that article, I’ve decided to publish a series of articles which I hope will clear up some of [...]

What is the T-SQL Merge Statement and How do you use it?

I mentioned in a previous article that many posts on T-SQL Merge read like Books Online. Speaking of Books Online, let’s start by glancing at the syntax portion of the T-SQL Merge Page. I’ll take the liberty of re-posting just the first 25% or so below.

[ WITH [,...n] ]
MERGE
[...]

Got the Urge to Merge?

The T-Sql Merge statement, introduced in SQL 2008, is powerful, versatile, and performant. However, it is also one of T-SQL’s least understood statements. Most DBAs know they can use it to insert, update, and delete data in a target table in a single transaction, which generally outperforms separate statements. Fewer know, however, that it can [...]

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